Conservation

Access & Preservation

The Conservation department provides advisory and technical services in support of Museum initiatives, focusing on enhanced research, teaching, preservation, and public exhibition of the collections. The department collaborates with Museum staff, faculty, students, researchers, and community members to facilitate safe and open access and long-term preservation of the collections and associated archival documents. Conservation efforts are broad-based and contribute to increased knowledge and understanding of objects and their histories.  

The department focuses on preservation education and consultation, advising on collections care, integrated pest management, and collections rehousing. Conservators oversee building-wide environmental monitoring programs and conduct collection condition assessments. They are actively engaged in documentation, materials analysis, and conservation treatment of objects. Conservators consult on new acquisitions, material sampling requests, loans, and in-house exhibits. The department advises on emergency preparedness strategies for the collections.

Special projects focus on the Museum’s highest preservation priorities to address long-term care and environmental needs of fragile or at-risk collections. Conservators partner with curators and conservation colleagues on technical research. 

Scott Fulton, Conservator

Scott Fulton, Conservator.

Judy Jungels, Assistant, Conservator
Judy Jungels, Assistant Conservator.

 The Conservation Department’s current facility of 5,000 square feet includes a photographic studio, a reference library, offices, and a working laboratory. Prior public and private funds (i.e. the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation), with ongoing support from the University and Museum, provide for a properly equipped lab. The Museum supports three full-time conservators and training opportunities for students and conservation interns. Grant funding supports projects dedicated to meet the Museum’s highest priority collection conservation needs and provide additional support for internships.

Peabody Museum conservators are members of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC), the national professional organization of conservation professionals. 

 

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T. Rose Holdcraft, Conservator and Administrative Head of Conservation.

 

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