For Immediate Release

The Moche of Ancient Peru: Media and Messages

New Book in the Peabody Museum Collection Series

(Cambridge, January 5, 2011) In the coastal lowlands of northern Peru, the Moche archaeological culture flourished from about A.D. 100 to 800. Moche culture is known for its vividly painted and realistically modeled ceramics. A new volume in the award-winning Peabody Museum Collection Series presents a refreshing analysis of Moche works from the magnificent collection at Harvard's Peabody Museum. In the richly illustrated The Moche of Ancient Peru: Media and Messages, archaeologist Jeffrey Quilter gives readers a thorough introduction to this fascinating culture and explores current thinking about Moche politics, history, society, religion, and art.

The Peabody's collection became a means for Quilter to investigate how the Moche used various media, particularly ceramics, to convey messages about their lives and beliefs. In The Moche of Ancient Peru, Quilter provides a critical examination of many commonly held interpretations of Moche artifacts and their imagery and casts new light on the traditional arts of Peru. In the process, he raises important questions about art production and its role in ancient and modern cultures.

Aimed at the general reader and the specialist alike, The Moche of Ancient Peru is the first extensive analysis of the Peabody's collection of Moche ceramics. Peruvian archaeologist Luis Jaime Castillo calls Quilter's book "a brilliant introduction to some of the most fascinating archaeological investigations currently being undertaken in the New World."

About Jeffrey Quilter
Jeffrey Quilter is Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs at the Peabody Museum. He has been working with Peruvian archaeologists at the El Brujo Archaeological Complex in the Chicama Valley since 2002. Currently he directs a multidisciplinary study of a 16th-17th century colonial town and church complex, Sta. Magdalena de Cao, Viejo, at El Brujo.

Quilter's Magdalena de Cao excavation made headlines in fall 2010. He and colleagues published an article in American Anthropologist about the traces of a lost language discovered on a 400 year-old letter.

Quilter has published on a number of topics in archaeology as well as edited numerous volumes. His monographs are Life and Death at Paloma, Society and Mortuary Practices in a Preceramic Peruvian Village. (1989, University of Iowa Press); Cobble Circles and Standing Stones: Archaeology at the Rivas Site, Costa Rica. (2004, University of Iowa Pres); and Treasures of the Andes (2005, Duncan Baird).

About the Peabody Museum Press
The Peabody Museum began issuing monographs, archaeological research reports, and other publications related to the Museum’s collections and scholarly activities in 1888. Today, the Peabody Museum Press publishes the unique resources of the Museum and the work of its affiliated scholars. The press’s books include works in Old and New World archaeology, zooarchaeology, biological and sociocultural anthropology, indigenous arts, anthropology and aesthetics, and material culture. The press also publishes exhibition catalogues and the work of the Robert Gardner Photography Fellows and Gardner Visiting Artists.

About the Peabody Museum
The Peabody Museum is among the oldest archaeological and ethnographic museums in the world with one of the finest collections of human cultural history found anywhere. It is home to superb materials from Africa, ancient Europe, North America, Mesoamerica, Oceania, and South America in particular. In addition to its archaeological and ethnographic holdings, the Museum’s photographic archives, one of the largest of its kind, hold more than 500,000 historical photographs, dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and chronicling anthropology, archaeology, and world culture.

Hours and location: 9 A.M. to 5 P.M., seven days a week. The Museum is closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. The Peabody Museum is located at 11 Divinity Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Museum is a short walk from the Harvard Square MBTA station. Admission is $9 for adults, $7 for students and seniors, $6 for children, 3–18. Free with Harvard ID or Museum membership. The Museum is free to Massachusetts residents Sundays, 9 A.M. to noon, year round, and Wednesdays from 3 P.M. to 5 P.M. (September to May). Admission includes admission to the Harvard Museum of Natural History. For more information call 617-496-1027 or go online to: www.peabody.harvard.edu.

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Media Contact:

Faith Sutter
Communications Coordinator
Peabody Museum
Tel: 617-495-3397
sutter@fas.harvard.edu

 

 

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moche of ancient peru

The Moche of Ancient Peru: Media and Messages by Jeffrey Quilter.

Forward by Luis Jaime Castillo B., Principal Professor, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru

Photographs by Mark Craig

Dr. Rubie Watson, Series Editor

Peabody Museum Press. $21.95 Publication date: January 15, 2011. The book may be purchased directly from the Peabody Museum or from your local booksellers.

See www.peabody.harvard.edu/publications for other fine books from the Peabody Museum Press.

Watch a short video about Moche ceramic bottles with Jeffrey Quilter.

 


 

 

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