Publications

Bookshelves filled completely with books of different colors and sizes.

Publications

The Peabody Museum has long published a variety of print and electronic publications relating to collections, projects, and excavations conducted by Peabody Museum staff and Department of Anthropology faculty.

Current publications can be found under Books with links to purchase, while pre-1970s publications include links to texts when available. Journals includes links to  RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics, available through the University of Chicago Press, as well as several electronic journals and newsletters. 

See all Publications

Books

A Chancay-Style Grave at Zapallan, Peru: An Analysis of Its Textiles, Pottery and Other Furnishings

Citation:

S. K. Lothrop and Joy Mahler. 1957. A Chancay-Style Grave at Zapallan, Peru: An Analysis of Its Textiles, Pottery and Other Furnishings, Pp. 92. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINE
A Chancay-Style Grave at Zapallan, Peru: An Analysis of Its Textiles, Pottery and Other Furnishings

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Papers Volume 50, no. 1
Last updated on 01/03/2022

A Lakota War Book from the Little Big Horn: The Pictographic "Autobiography of Half Moon"

Citation:

Castle McLaughlin. 12/13/2013. A Lakota War Book from the Little Big Horn: The Pictographic "Autobiography of Half Moon", Pp. 368. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOK
A Lakota War Book from the Little Big Horn: The Pictographic "Autobiography of Half Moon"

Abstract:

Foreword by Chief Joseph Brings Plenty, Cheyenne River Sioux

Houghton Library Studies 4

Winner, Bookbuilders of Boston/New England Book Show (General Trade, Illustrated)

First Place, NEMA Awards (Books >$500k)

"Transformative." Candace Greene

The composite nineteenth-century document known as "The Pictorial Autobiography of Half Moon, an Uncpapa Sioux Chief" has at its core seventy-seven drawings made by Lakota warriors of the northern Plains. Found in a funerary tipi on the Little Bighorn battlefield after Custer's defeat in 1876, the drawings are from a captured ledger book that was later acquired by Chicago journalist James "Phocion" Howard. Howard added an illustrated introduction and leather binding and presented the document as the autobiographical work of a "chief" named Half Moon.

Anthropologist Castle McLaughlin probes the complex life history and cultural significance of the ledger and demonstrates that the dramatic drawings, mostly of war exploits, were created by at least six different warrior-artists. Examining how allied Lakota and Cheyenne warriors understood their graphic records of warfare as objects as well as images, McLaughlin introduces the concept of "war books"—documents that were captured and modified by Native warriors in order to appropriate the power of Euroamerican literacy. Together, the vivid first-person depictions in the ledger—now in the collection of Harvard's Houghton Library—make up a rare Native American record of historic events that likely occurred between 1866 and 1868 during Red Cloud's War along the Bozeman Trail.

A complete color facsimile of the Houghton ledger is reproduced in this ground-breaking volume.

Castle McLaughlin is Peabody Museum Curator of North American Ethnology.

"McLaughlin’s latest publication brings readers into the world of the real Crazy Horse. … As McLaughlin explains, these [ledger] drawings are as rich and informative as any Euro‐American literary text"

—Henry Adams, Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History at Case Western Reserve University, The Conversation

>> read the full review 

 

"...completely engrossing."—David Wilk, WritersCast: The Voice of Writing

>> read the full review and listen to an interview with Castle McLaughlin

 

Please request signed copies when ordering by email.

Co-published with Houghton Library.

Last updated on 01/10/2022

A Noble Pursuit: The Duchess of Mecklenburg Collection from Iron Age Slovenia

Citation:

Gloria Polizzotti Greis. 4/30/2006. A Noble Pursuit: The Duchess of Mecklenburg Collection from Iron Age Slovenia, Pp. 128. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOK
A Noble Pursuit: The Duchess of Mecklenburg Collection from Iron Age Slovenia

Abstract:

Photographs by Hillel S. Burger

In 1905, to the consternation of her family and in defiance of convention, the 48-year-old Duchess Paul Friedrich of Mecklenburg took up the practice of archaeology. In the nine years leading up to the First World War, she successfully excavated twenty-one sites in her home province of Carniola (modern Slovenia), acquiring the patronage of Austro-Hungarian Emperor Franz Josef I and German Kaiser Wilhelm II. Mentored by the most important archaeologists of her time—Oscar Montelius and Josef Dechellette—the Duchess became an accomplished fieldworker and an important figure in the archaeology of Central Europe. Gloria Greis incorporates previously unpublished correspondence and other archival documents in this colorful account of the Duchess of Mecklenburg and her work.

The Mecklenburg Collection, the largest systematically excavated collection of European antiquities outside of Europe, resides in Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. The sites excavated by the Duchess, which encompass the scope of Iron Age cultures in Slovenia, form an important resource for studying the cultural history of the region. A Noble Pursuit presents a selection of beautifully photographed artifacts that provide an overview of the scope and importance of the collection as a whole and attest to the enduring quality of the Duchess’s pioneering work.

Gloria Polizzotti Greis is Executive Director of the Needham (Massachusetts) Historical Society.

Last updated on 01/13/2022

A Preliminary Study of the Prehistoric Ruins of Nakum, Guatemala: A Report of the Peabody Museum Expedition, 1909–1910

A Preliminary Study of the Prehistoric Ruins of Nakum, Guatemala: A Report of the Peabody Museum Expedition, 1909–1910

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Memoirs Volume 5, no. 3
Last updated on 01/03/2022

A Stone Age Cave Site in Tangier: Preliminary Report on the Excavations at the Mugharet El ‘Aliya, or High Cave, in Tangier

A Stone Age Cave Site in Tangier: Preliminary Report on the Excavations at the Mugharet El ‘Aliya, or High Cave, in Tangier

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Papers Volume 28, no. 1
Last updated on 01/10/2022
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Series

Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley: Report of Explorations for the Museum, 1898–1900, Part One

Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley: Report of Explorations for the Museum, 1898–1900, Part One

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Memoirs Volume 2, no. 1
Last updated on 01/03/2022

Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley: Report of Explorations for the Museum, 1898–1900, Part Two

Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley: Report of Explorations for the Museum, 1898–1900, Part Two

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Memoirs Volume 2, no. 2
Last updated on 01/03/2022

Researches in the Uloa Valley, Honduras and Caverns of Copan, Honduras: Report on Explorations by the Museum, 1896-1897

Researches in the Uloa Valley, Honduras and Caverns of Copan, Honduras: Report on Explorations by the Museum, 1896-1897

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Memoirs Volume 1, no. 4
Last updated on 01/03/2022

The Chultunes of Labná, Yucatan: Report of Explorations by the Museum, 1888–89 and 1890–91

Citation:

Edward H. Thompson. 1897. The Chultunes of Labná, Yucatan: Report of Explorations by the Museum, 1888–89 and 1890–91, Pp. 50. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINE
The Chultunes of Labná, Yucatan: Report of Explorations by the Museum, 1888–89 and 1890–91

Abstract:

Peabody Museum Memoirs Volume 1, no. 3
Last updated on 01/03/2022

The Neville Site: 8,000 Years at Amoskeag, Manchester, New Hampshire

Citation:

Dena Ferran Dincauze. 9/15/2005. The Neville Site: 8,000 Years at Amoskeag, Manchester, New Hampshire, Pp. 160. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOK
The Neville Site: 8,000 Years at Amoskeag, Manchester, New Hampshire

Abstract:

The 1968 excavation of the Neville Site in Manchester, New Hampshire, was a major event in the archaeological history of New England. Analysis of the site extended the known duration of continuous occupation in the region by some 3,000 years and demonstrated early connections between the New England area and the Southeast. The Neville Site was first occupied nearly 8,000 years ago, when the Eastern coastal plain from North Carolina to New Hampshire was essentially a single cultural province. Current excavations in Manchester have reinvigorated interest in the archaeology of New Hampshire and created a demand for this facsimile edition of the original 1976 publication.

Last updated on 01/13/2022
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