Paintings, Prints, and Drawings

2020
To Make Their Own Way in the World: The Enduring Legacy of the Zealy Daguerreotypes
Deborah Willis and Ilisa Barbash, Molly Rogers. 9/22/2020. To Make Their Own Way in the World: The Enduring Legacy of the Zealy Daguerreotypes, Pp. 488. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Foreword by Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Photographic Essay by Carrie Mae Weems

Bronze Medal, 2021 IPPY Awards (Photography)
Finalist, 2021 Arles Book Awards (Historical)

To Make Their Own Way in the World is a profound consideration of some of the most challenging images in the history of photography: fifteen daguerreotypes of Alfred, Delia, Drana, Fassena, Jack, Jem, and Renty―men and women of African descent who were enslaved in South Carolina.

Photographed by Joseph T. Zealy for Harvard professor Louis Agassiz in 1850, they were rediscovered at Harvard’s Peabody Museum in 1976. This groundbreaking multidisciplinary volume features essays by prominent scholars who explore such topics as the identities of the people depicted in the daguerreotypes, the close relationship between photography and race, and visual narratives of slavery and its lasting effects. With over two hundred illustrations, including new photography by Carrie Mae Weems, this book frames the Zealy daguerreotypes as works of urgent engagement.

Copublished by Aperture and the Peabody Museum Press.

2018
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 10: Part 1: Cotzumalhuapa
Oswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos. 1/15/2018. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 10: Part 1: Cotzumalhuapa. Edited by Barbara Fash, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

2013
A Lakota War Book from the Little Big Horn: The Pictographic "Autobiography of Half Moon"
Castle McLaughlin. 12/13/2013. A Lakota War Book from the Little Big Horn: The Pictographic "Autobiography of Half Moon", Pp. 368. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Foreword by Chief Joseph Brings Plenty, Cheyenne River Sioux

Houghton Library Studies 4

Winner, Bookbuilders of Boston/New England Book Show (General Trade, Illustrated)

First Place, NEMA Awards (Books >$500k)

"Transformative." Candace Greene

The composite nineteenth-century document known as "The Pictorial Autobiography of Half Moon, an Uncpapa Sioux Chief" has at its core seventy-seven drawings made by Lakota warriors of the northern Plains. Found in a funerary tipi on the Little Bighorn battlefield after Custer's defeat in 1876, the drawings are from a captured ledger book that was later acquired by Chicago journalist James "Phocion" Howard. Howard added an illustrated introduction and leather binding and presented the document as the autobiographical work of a "chief" named Half Moon.

Anthropologist Castle McLaughlin probes the complex life history and cultural significance of the ledger and demonstrates that the dramatic drawings, mostly of war exploits, were created by at least six different warrior-artists. Examining how allied Lakota and Cheyenne warriors understood their graphic records of warfare as objects as well as images, McLaughlin introduces the concept of "war books"—documents that were captured and modified by Native warriors in order to appropriate the power of Euroamerican literacy. Together, the vivid first-person depictions in the ledger—now in the collection of Harvard's Houghton Library—make up a rare Native American record of historic events that likely occurred between 1866 and 1868 during Red Cloud's War along the Bozeman Trail.

A complete color facsimile of the Houghton ledger is reproduced in this ground-breaking volume.

Castle McLaughlin is Peabody Museum Curator of North American Ethnology.

"McLaughlin’s latest publication brings readers into the world of the real Crazy Horse. … As McLaughlin explains, these [ledger] drawings are as rich and informative as any Euro‐American literary text"

—Henry Adams, Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History at Case Western Reserve University, The Conversation

>> read the full review 

 

"...completely engrossing."—David Wilk, WritersCast: The Voice of Writing

>> read the full review and listen to an interview with Castle McLaughlin

 

Please request signed copies when ordering by email.

Co-published with Houghton Library.

2012
Hunters, Carvers & Collectors: The Chauncey C. Nash Collection of Inuit Art
Maija M. Lutz. 11/12/2012. Hunters, Carvers & Collectors: The Chauncey C. Nash Collection of Inuit Art, Pp. 128. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract
In the late 1950s, Chauncey C. Nash started collecting Inuit carvings just as the art of printmaking was being introduced in Kinngait (Cape Dorset), an Inuit community on Baffin Island in the Canadian territory of Nunavut. Nash donated some 300 prints and sculptures to Harvard’s Peabody Museum—one of the oldest collections of early modern Inuit art. The Peabody collection includes not only early Inuit sculpture but also many of the earliest prints on paper made by the women and men who helped propel Inuit art onto the world stage.

Author Maija M. Lutz draws from ethnology, archaeology, art history, and cultural studies to tell the story of a little-known collection that represents one of the most vibrant and experimental periods in the development of contemporary Inuit art. Lavishly illustrated, Hunters, Carvers, and Collectors presents numerous never-before-published gems, including carvings by the artists John Kavik, Johnniebo Ashevak, and Peter Qumalu POV Assappa. This latest contribution to the award-winning Peabody Museum Collections Series fills an important gap in the literature of Native American art.

2006
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 2: Tonina
Ian Graham. 11/15/2006. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 2: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 2: Tonina
Ian Graham. 11/14/2006. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 2: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

2004
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 2: Part 1: Naranjo
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 12/1/2004. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 2: Part 1: Naranjo, Pp. 64. Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras
David Stuart and Ian Graham. 3/3/2004. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

The goal of the Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

The first of five anticipated volumes on the renowned monuments of Piedras Negras, Guatemala, this volume describes the site and the history of exploration at this important center of Classic Maya civilization. It includes photographs and detailed line drawings of twelve of the inscribed sculpted monuments at Piedras Negras, as well as a map of the ruins.

1999
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 3: Tonina
Ian Graham and Peter Mathews. 3/31/1999. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 3: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1997
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 8: Part 1: Coba
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 12/29/1997. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 8: Part 1: Coba, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1996
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 7: Part 1: Seibal
Ian Graham. 3/19/1996. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 7: Part 1: Seibal, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1993
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 2: Uxmal
Ian Graham. 3/1/1993. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 2: Uxmal, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 3: Uxmal, Xcalumkin
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 3/1/1993. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 3: Uxmal, Xcalumkin, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1987
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 3: Uaxactun
Ian Graham. 2/9/1987. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 3: Uaxactun, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1985
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 2: Xultun
Eric von Euw and Ian Graham. 6/10/1985. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 2: Xultun, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1983
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 1: Tonina
Peter Mathews. 8/1/1983. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 1: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1980
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 2: Part 3: Ixkun, Ucanal, Ixtutz, Naranjo
Ian Graham. 3/12/1980. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 2: Part 3: Ixkun, Ucanal, Ixtutz, Naranjo, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 1: Yaxchilan
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 3/12/1980. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 1: Yaxchilan, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

1979
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 2: Yaxchilan
Ian Graham. 5/25/1979. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 2: Yaxchilan, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 1: Xultun
Eric von Euw. 1/1/1979. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 1: Xultun, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 25 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions under the editorial and artistic direction of Mayanist Ian Graham. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world.

Each volume in the series consists of three fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings. The text of each volume presents descriptive information about the sites and monuments and their associated artifacts.

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