Archaeological analysis

2020
Kebara Cave, Mt. Carmel, Israel, Part II: The Middle and Upper Paleolithic Archaeology
1/7/2020. Kebara Cave, Mt. Carmel, Israel, Part II: The Middle and Upper Paleolithic Archaeology, Pp. 456. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The remains from Skhul, Qafzeh, Amud, and Kebara caves in Israel provide evidence for the possible contemporaneity and eventual replacement of several distinct hominin populations over time: early Archaic-Modern humans by Neanderthals, and Neanderthals by Modern humans. Kebara Cave, which dates to 65,000 to 48,000 years ago, is well known for its Neanderthal remains and marvelously preserved archaeological record. Dense concentrations of fireplaces and ash lenses and rich assemblages of stone tools, animal bones, and charred plant remains testify to repeated and intensive use of the cave by late Middle Paleolithic foragers.

This second and final volume of the Kebara Cave site report presents findings from nine years of excavation and analysis of the archaeology, paleontology, human remains, and lithic industries from the Middle and Upper Paleolithic periods. Its full documentation of the daily activities of the cave’s Neanderthal inhabitants clearly indicates behavioral patterns generally attributed only to Modern humans. The two volumes on Kebara Cave provide a cornerstone for the story of humankind in a critical geographic region: the continental crossroads between Africa and Eurasia in the Levant.

2012
Hunters, Carvers & Collectors: The Chauncey C. Nash Collection of Inuit Art
Maija M. Lutz. 11/12/2012. Hunters, Carvers & Collectors: The Chauncey C. Nash Collection of Inuit Art, Pp. 128. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract
In the late 1950s, Chauncey C. Nash started collecting Inuit carvings just as the art of printmaking was being introduced in Kinngait (Cape Dorset), an Inuit community on Baffin Island in the Canadian territory of Nunavut. Nash donated some 300 prints and sculptures to Harvard’s Peabody Museum—one of the oldest collections of early modern Inuit art. The Peabody collection includes not only early Inuit sculpture but also many of the earliest prints on paper made by the women and men who helped propel Inuit art onto the world stage.

Author Maija M. Lutz draws from ethnology, archaeology, art history, and cultural studies to tell the story of a little-known collection that represents one of the most vibrant and experimental periods in the development of contemporary Inuit art. Lavishly illustrated, Hunters, Carvers, and Collectors presents numerous never-before-published gems, including carvings by the artists John Kavik, Johnniebo Ashevak, and Peter Qumalu POV Assappa. This latest contribution to the award-winning Peabody Museum Collections Series fills an important gap in the literature of Native American art.

2011
The Moche of Ancient Peru: Media and Messages
Jeffrey Quilter. 2/28/2011. The Moche of Ancient Peru: Media and Messages, Pp. 172. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Peru’s ancient Moche culture is represented in a magnificent collection of artifacts at Harvard’s Peabody Museum. In this richly illustrated volume, Jeffrey Quilter presents a fascinating introduction to this intriguing culture and explores current thinking about Moche politics, history, society, and religion.

Quilter utilizes the Peabody’s collection as a means to investigate how the Moche used various media, particularly ceramics, to convey messages about their lives and beliefs. His presentation provides a critical examination and rethinking of many of the commonly held interpretations of Moche artifacts and their imagery, raising important issues of art production and its role in ancient and modern societies.

The most up-to-date monograph available on the Moche—and the first extensive discussion of the Peabody Museum’s collection of Moche ceramics—this volume provides an introduction for the general reader and contributes to ongoing scholarly discussions. Quilter’s fresh reading of Moche visual imagery raises new questions about the art and culture of ancient Peru.

2007
Feeding the Ancestors: Tlingit Carved Horn Spoons
Anne-Marie Victor-Howe. 6/30/2007. Feeding the Ancestors: Tlingit Carved Horn Spoons, Pp. 128. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Foreword by Rosita Worl
Photographs by Hillel S. Burger

Silver Medal, 2008 IPPY Awards (Multicultural Non-Fiction Adult)

Feeding the Ancestors presents an exquisite group of carved spoons from the Pacific Northwest that resides in the collections of Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Carved from the horns of mountain goats and Dall sheep, and incorporating elements of abalone shell and metal, most of the spoons were collected in Alaska in the late nineteenth century and were made and used by members of the Tlingit tribe. Hillel Burger’s beautiful color photographs reveal every nuance of the carvers’ extraordinary artistry.

Anne-Marie Victor-Howe introduces the collectors and describes the means by which these and other ethnographic objects were acquired. In the process, she paints a vivid picture of the “Last Frontier” just before and shortly after the United States purchased Alaska. A specialist in the ethnography of the Native peoples of the Northwest Coast, Victor-Howe provides a fascinating glimpse into these aboriginal subsistence cultures as she explains the manufacture and function of traditional spoons. Her accounts of the clan stories associated with specific carvings and of the traditional shamanic uses of spoons are the result of extensive consultation with Tlingit elders, scholars, and carvers.

Feeding the Ancestors is the first scholarly study of traditional feast spoons and a valuable contribution to our knowledge of Pacific Northwest Coast peoples and their art.

Anne-Marie Victor-Howe is an anthropologist and Research Associate of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University.

Rosita Worl is President of the Sealaska Heritage Institute in Juneau, Alaska.

2006
The Faunas of Hayonim Cave, Israel: A 200,000-Year Record of Paleolithic Diet, Demography, and Society
Mary C. Stiner. 2/28/2006. The Faunas of Hayonim Cave, Israel: A 200,000-Year Record of Paleolithic Diet, Demography, and Society, Pp. 330. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

A decade of zooarchaeological fieldwork (1992-2001) went into Mary Stiner’s pathbreaking analysis of changes in human ecology from the early Mousterian period through the end of Paleolithic cultures in the Levant. Stiner employs a comparative approach to understanding early human behavioral and environmental change, based on a detailed study of fourteen bone assemblages from Hayonim Cave and Meged Rockshelter in Israel’s Galilee. Principally anthropological in outlook, Stiner’s analysis also integrates chemistry, foraging and population ecology, vertebrate paleontology, and biogeography. Her research focuses first on the formation history, or taphonomy, of bone accumulations, and second on questions about the economic behaviors of early humans, including the early development of human adaptations for hunting large prey and the relative "footprint" of humans in Pleistocene ecosystems of the Levant.

2003
Stránská skála: Origins of the Upper Paleolithic in the Brno Basin, Moravia, Czech Republic
Jirí Svoboda Ofer and Bar-Yosef. 10/17/2003. Stránská skála: Origins of the Upper Paleolithic in the Brno Basin, Moravia, Czech Republic, Pp. 232. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

In this volume, an international and interdisciplinary team of scholars—Czech and American archaeologists, paleoanthropologists, geologists, and biologists—report on the results of the investigations from 1980 through the 1990s at Stránská skála, a complex of open-air loess sites on the outskirts of the Brno Basin in the Czech Republic.

The volume presents in-depth studies of the geology, paleopedology, frost processes, vegetation, fauna, and archaeological features of Stránská skála that break new ground in our understanding of early modern humans in central Europe.

Jirí Svoboda is Professor at the University of Brno and Director of the Institute of Archaeology, Dolni Vestonice, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic.

Ofer Bar-Yosef is MacCurdy Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, Harvard University.

1997
An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part I: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud
Ofer Bar-Yosef and Avi Gopher. 5/21/1997. An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part I: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud, Pp. 280. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

The "Neolithic Revolution" in Southwestern Asia involved major transformations of economy and society that began during the Natufian period in the southern Levant and continued through Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) and into Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). The authors describe that process at Netiv Hagdud, with additional material from the Natufian site of Salibiya IX. Includes reports on the archaeology, lithics, bone tools, lithic use-wear, marine shells, burials, and plant remains.

1996
Shell Gorgets: Styles of the Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric Southeast
Jeffrey P. Brain and Philip Phillips. 3/29/1996. Shell Gorgets: Styles of the Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric Southeast, Pp. 544. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Engraved shell gorgets are found throughout prehistoric southeastern North America. The artistic sophistication of these gorgets lends itself to the sensitive stylistic and chronological analysis offered here. In part one of this volume, the gorgets are classified into styles; in part two, described archaeological sites are analyzed for associations and chronology; and in part three, information about the gorgets is correlated with other artifactual evidence, and patterns of intersite distribution are examined for chronological insights and dynamic interpretations.

1995
Ceramics and Artifacts from Excavations in the Copan Residential Zone
Gordon R. Willey, Richard M. Leventhal, Arthur A. Demarest, and William L. Fash. 2/21/1995. Ceramics and Artifacts from Excavations in the Copan Residential Zone, Pp. 496. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

This is the first of two volumes addressing the Harvard University excavations in an outlying residential zone of the Copan in Honduras. The book offers detailed descriptions of ceramics and all other artifacts during 1976–1977. The materials pertain largely to the Late Classic Period. Ceramics are presented according to the type-variety system.

1992
Artifacts from the Cenote of Sacrifice, Chichen Itza, Yucatan
Clemency Chase Coggins. 10/14/1992. Artifacts from the Cenote of Sacrifice, Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Pp. 408. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Introduction by Gordon R. Willey
Appendixes by April K. Sievert and Fred Trembour

In this abundantly illustrated third and final volume on the artifacts found by Edward H. Thompson in the Well of Sacrifice, specialists analyze the great variety of objects and debate whether they represent evidence of dateable prehistorical ritual. The collection includes the rare remains of hundreds of textiles, wooden objects, and copal incense offerings that were preserved in the waters of this limestone sinkhole, as well as the lithics, ceramics and bone and shell artifacts commonly found in Maya burials and caches and about 250 mammalian remains. These objects are remarkable for having been cut, torn, broken, and burned before they were thrown into the green waters of the sacred well at Chichen Itza.

1990
Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, V
Gordon R. Willey, John A. Graham, III Gair Tourtellot, and Mary Pohl. 12/12/1990. Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, V, Pp. 290. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Volume 1. Monumental Sculpture and Hieroglyphic Inscriptions
Volume 2. Burials
Volume 3. The Ethnozoology of the Maya
Volume 4. General Summary and Conclusions

Seibal is a major ruin of the southern Maya lowlands, its vast ceremonial center covering several high hills on the banks of the Pasion River in the Guatemalan Department of Peten. In five volumes published over a 15-year period, the archaeological team headed by Gordon R. Willey presents a comprehensive review of their fieldwork from 1964 to 1968 and the results of many years of subsequent data analysis. The volumes also report on explorations in the peripheral settlements outside of the Seibal center and provide a regional view of the evolution of lowland Maya culture from the Middle and Late Preclassic through the Late Classic periods.

1989
Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, IV
III Gair Tourtellot. 10/5/1989. Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, IV. Edited by Gordon R. Willey, Pp. 496. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Peripheral Survey and Excavation, Settlement and Community Patterns

Seibal is a major ruin of the southern Maya lowlands, its vast ceremonial center covering several high hills on the banks of the Pasion River in the Guatemalan Department of Peten. In five volumes published over a 15-year period, the archaeological team headed by Gordon R. Willey presents a comprehensive review of their fieldwork from 1964 to 1968 and the results of many years of subsequent data analysis. The volumes also report on explorations in the peripheral settlements outside of the Seibal center and provide a regional view of the evolution of lowland Maya culture from the Middle and Late Preclassic through the Late Classic periods.

1963
Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica
S. K. Lothrop. 1963. Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica, Pp. 227. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 51
1962
The Cerro Colorado Site and Pithouse Architecture in the Southwestern United States prior to A.D. 900
Jr. William R. Bullard. 1962. The Cerro Colorado Site and Pithouse Architecture in the Southwestern United States prior to A.D. 900, Pp. 261. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 44, no. 2
1960
North Arabian Desert Archaeological Survey
Henry Field. 1960. North Arabian Desert Archaeological Survey, Pp. 319. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 45, no. 2
1957
An Archaeological Survey of West Central New Mexico and East Central Arizona
Edward Bridge Danson. 1957. An Archaeological Survey of West Central New Mexico and East Central Arizona, Pp. 175. Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 44, no. 1
The Archaeology of Central and Southern Honduras
Doris Stone. 1957. The Archaeology of Central and Southern Honduras, Pp. 227. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 49, no. 2
A Chancay-Style Grave at Zapallan, Peru: An Analysis of Its Textiles, Pottery and Other Furnishings
S. K. Lothrop and Joy Mahler. 1957. A Chancay-Style Grave at Zapallan, Peru: An Analysis of Its Textiles, Pottery and Other Furnishings, Pp. 92. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 50, no. 1
Late Nazca Burials at Chaviña, Peru
S. K. Lothrop and Joy Mahler. 1957. Late Nazca Burials at Chaviña, Peru, Pp. 106. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 50, no. 2
1956
A Study of Navajo Symbolism
Franc Johnson Newcomb, Stanley Fishler, and Mary C. Wheelwright. 1956. A Study of Navajo Symbolism, Pp. 132. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. READ ONLINEAbstract
Peabody Museum Papers Volume 32, no. 3

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