Publications

2004
Mammal Remains from Archaeological Sites
Stanley J. Olsen. 5/25/2004. Mammal Remains from Archaeological Sites, Pp. 174. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

This classic work provides a guide to the identification of nonhuman animal bones. Olsen illustrates various diagnostic characteristics of rodents and dogs; jaguars and other members of the cat family; the domestic horse, pig, and goat; and other animals whose bones are commonly found in archaeological sites in the southeastern United States.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras
David Stuart and Ian Graham. 3/3/2004. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9: Part 1: Piedras Negras, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

The first of five anticipated volumes on the renowned monuments of Piedras Negras, Guatemala, this volume describes the site and the history of exploration at this important center of Classic Maya civilization. It includes photographs and detailed line drawings of twelve of the inscribed sculpted monuments at Piedras Negras, as well as a map of the ruins.

Gifts of the Great River: Arkansas Effigy Pottery from the Edwin Curtiss Collection
John H. House. 1/22/2004. Gifts of the Great River: Arkansas Effigy Pottery from the Edwin Curtiss Collection, Pp. 120. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Foreword by Ian W. Brown

In 1879 Edwin Curtiss set out for the wild St. Francis River region of northeastern Arkansas to collect archaeological specimens for the Peabody Museum. By the time Curtiss completed his fifty-six days of Arkansas fieldwork, he had sent nearly 1,000 pottery vessels to Cambridge and had put the Peabody on the map as the repository of one of the world’s finest collections of Mississippian artifacts. John House brings us a lively account of the work of this nineteenth-century fieldworker, the Native culture he explored, and the rich legacies left by both. The result is a vivid re-creation of the world of Indian peoples in the Mississippi River lowlands in the last centuries before European contact. The volume’s focus is Curtiss’s collection of charming and expressive effigy vessels: earthenware bowls and bottles that incorporate forms of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians, and humans, including the Peabody’s famous red-and-white head vase.

John H. House is Station Archaeologist, Pine Bluff Research Station, and Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.

2003
Collecting the Weaver's Art: The William Claflin Collection of Southwestern Textiles
Laurie D. Webster. 12/9/2003. Collecting the Weaver's Art: The William Claflin Collection of Southwestern Textiles, Pp. 160. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract
by Laurie D. Webster

 

Foreword by Tony Berlant

This is the first publication on a remarkable collection of sixty-six outstanding Pueblo and Navajo textiles donated to the Peabody Museum in the 1980s by William Claflin, Jr., a prominent Boston businessman, avocational anthropologist, and patron of Southwestern archaeology. Claflin bequeathed to the museum not only these beautiful textiles, but also his detailed accounts of their collection histories—a rare record of the individuals who had owned or traded these weavings before they found a home in his private museum. Textile scholar Laurie Webster tells the stories of the weavings as they left their native Southwest and traveled eastward, passing through the hands of such owners and traders as a Ute Indian chief, a New England schoolteacher, a renowned artist, and various military officers and Indian agents. Her concise overview of Navajo and Pueblo weaving traditions is enhanced by the reflections of noted artist and Navajo textile expert Tony Berlant in his foreword to the text.

Laurie D. Webster is an independent scholar and textile consultant, and Visiting Scholar in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona.

Tony Berlant is an artist and author, and collector, curator, and expert on Navajo textiles.

Stránská skála: Origins of the Upper Paleolithic in the Brno Basin, Moravia, Czech Republic
Jirí Svoboda Ofer and Bar-Yosef. 10/17/2003. Stránská skála: Origins of the Upper Paleolithic in the Brno Basin, Moravia, Czech Republic, Pp. 232. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

In this volume, an international and interdisciplinary team of scholars—Czech and American archaeologists, paleoanthropologists, geologists, and biologists—report on the results of the investigations from 1980 through the 1990s at Stránská skála, a complex of open-air loess sites on the outskirts of the Brno Basin in the Czech Republic.

The volume presents in-depth studies of the geology, paleopedology, frost processes, vegetation, fauna, and archaeological features of Stránská skála that break new ground in our understanding of early modern humans in central Europe.

Jirí Svoboda is Professor at the University of Brno and Director of the Institute of Archaeology, Dolni Vestonice, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic.

Ofer Bar-Yosef is MacCurdy Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, Harvard University.

Approaches to Faunal Analysis in the Middle East
Melinda A. Zeder. 6/26/2003. Approaches to Faunal Analysis in the Middle East. Edited by Richard H. Meadow, Pp. 206. Harvard University Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

This volume addresses the methodology and application of a faunal analysis, specifically as it pertains to data from the Middle East. Topics include a wide range of approaches to the study of the faunal remains, from the methodology of investigating issues of domestication to the utilization of computer analysis in the identification of remains.

2001
Excavations at Tepe Yahya, Iran, 1967-1975, Volume III: The Third Millennium
D. T. by Potts. 11/14/2001. Excavations at Tepe Yahya, Iran, 1967-1975, Volume III: The Third Millennium. Edited by C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky, Pp. 388. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Situated roughly midway between the great cities of the Indus Valley and those of the Mesopotamian plains, Tepe Yahya occupies a special place in our conceptions of relations between these distant territories during the early Bronze Age. Its third-millennium levels, dating from 3000 to 2100 B.C., are particularly important.

In this definitive study, D. T. Potts describes the stratigraphy, architecture, ceramics, and chronology of the site and presents a full inventory of the small finds. Holly Pittman contributes comprehensive illustrations and a discussion of the seals and sealings, and Philip Kohl provides an analysis of the carved chlorite industry. In a foreword and afterword, project director C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky tells the story of the archaeological expedition and reflects on the contributions of the Tepe Yahya project.

2000
Nyae Nyae !Kung Beliefs and Rites
Lorna J. Marshall. 1/24/2000. Nyae Nyae !Kung Beliefs and Rites, Pp. 400. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

With style and depth, Lorna Marshall leads the reader through the intricacies, ambiguities, and silences of !Kung beliefs. Her narrative, based on fieldwork among the Bushmen of the Kalahari in the early 1950s, brings into focus a way of life that appears to have existed for millennia. She presents the culture, beliefs, and spirituality of one of the last true hunting-and-gathering peoples by focusing on members of different bands as they reveal their own views. This account, with photography by John Marshall, presents a system of beliefs, one in which personified deities and unpersonifled supernatural forces (n!ow and n/um) interact with man and the natural world. The !Kung believe that this interaction accounts for much of the mystery of life and the vicissitudes of the good and evil that befall mankind. The book also depicts an egalitarian lifestyle based on sharing and group awareness, a lifestyle that has not survived intact the increasing integration of the Bushmen into the modern world.

A companion volume to her 1976 work, The !Kung of Nyae Nyae, this book was published to mark the one-hundredth birthday of Lorna Marshall (1898 – 2002).

1999
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 3: Tonina
Ian Graham and Peter Mathews. 3/31/1999. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 3: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

1997
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 8: Part 1: Coba
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 12/29/1997. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 8: Part 1: Coba, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part I: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud
Ofer Bar-Yosef and Avi Gopher. 5/21/1997. An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part I: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud, Pp. 280. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

The "Neolithic Revolution" in Southwestern Asia involved major transformations of economy and society that began during the Natufian period in the southern Levant and continued through Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) and into Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). The authors describe that process at Netiv Hagdud, with additional material from the Natufian site of Salibiya IX. Includes reports on the archaeology, lithics, bone tools, lithic use-wear, marine shells, burials, and plant remains.

1996
Shell Gorgets: Styles of the Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric Southeast
Jeffrey P. Brain and Philip Phillips. 3/29/1996. Shell Gorgets: Styles of the Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric Southeast, Pp. 544. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Engraved shell gorgets are found throughout prehistoric southeastern North America. The artistic sophistication of these gorgets lends itself to the sensitive stylistic and chronological analysis offered here. In part one of this volume, the gorgets are classified into styles; in part two, described archaeological sites are analyzed for associations and chronology; and in part three, information about the gorgets is correlated with other artifactual evidence, and patterns of intersite distribution are examined for chronological insights and dynamic interpretations.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 2: Tonina
Ian Graham and Peter Mathews. 3/19/1996. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 2: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 7: Part 1: Seibal
Ian Graham. 3/19/1996. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 7: Part 1: Seibal, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

1995
Ceramics and Artifacts from Excavations in the Copan Residential Zone
Gordon R. Willey, Richard M. Leventhal, Arthur A. Demarest, and William L. Fash. 2/21/1995. Ceramics and Artifacts from Excavations in the Copan Residential Zone, Pp. 496. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

This is the first of two volumes addressing the Harvard University excavations in an outlying residential zone of the Copan in Honduras. The book offers detailed descriptions of ceramics and all other artifacts during 1976–1977. The materials pertain largely to the Late Classic Period. Ceramics are presented according to the type-variety system.

1994
Origins of the Bronze Age Oasis Civilization in Central Asia
Fred Hiebert. 11/28/1994. Origins of the Bronze Age Oasis Civilization in Central Asia, Pp. 240. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

The Murghad River delta, the site of ancient Margiana, was extensively settled during at least part of the Bronze Age, between 2200 and 1750 B.C. Oases in an otherwise desert region, settlements were situated along deltaic branches of the river or canals dug from those branches. Excavations at one of the largest and most complex of these sites, Gonur depe, have been ongoing for many years under the direction of Victor Sarianidi. During the 1988–89 field season, Fred Hiebert excavated part of Gonur in collaboration with the Ministry of Culture of Turkmenistan and the Institute of Archaeology in Moscow.

Published here, the results provide a key to understanding the large corpus of material of the Bactro-Margiana Archaeological Complex extracted over the past 30 years from this and neighboring sites of the Oxus civilization.

An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part II: The Fauna of Netiv Hagdud
Eitan Tchernov. 9/15/1994. An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley, Part II: The Fauna of Netiv Hagdud, Pp. 112. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

The “Neolithic Revolution” in Southwestern Asia involved major transformations of economy and society that began during the Natufian period in the southern Levant and continued through Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) and into Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB). The authors describe that process at Netiv Hagdud, with additional material from the Natufian site of Salibiya IX. Includes reports on the archaeology, lithics, bone tools, lithic use-wear, marine shells, burials, and plant remains.

1993
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 2: Uxmal
Ian Graham. 3/1/1993. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 2: Uxmal, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 3: Uxmal, Xcalumkin
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 3/1/1993. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4: Part 3: Uxmal, Xcalumkin, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

1992
Artifacts from the Cenote of Sacrifice, Chichen Itza, Yucatan
Clemency Chase Coggins. 10/14/1992. Artifacts from the Cenote of Sacrifice, Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Pp. 408. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Introduction by Gordon R. Willey
Appendixes by April K. Sievert and Fred Trembour

In this abundantly illustrated third and final volume on the artifacts found by Edward H. Thompson in the Well of Sacrifice, specialists analyze the great variety of objects and debate whether they represent evidence of dateable prehistorical ritual. The collection includes the rare remains of hundreds of textiles, wooden objects, and copal incense offerings that were preserved in the waters of this limestone sinkhole, as well as the lithics, ceramics and bone and shell artifacts commonly found in Maya burials and caches and about 250 mammalian remains. These objects are remarkable for having been cut, torn, broken, and burned before they were thrown into the green waters of the sacred well at Chichen Itza.

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