Publications

1990
Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, V
Gordon R. Willey, John A. Graham, III Gair Tourtellot, and Mary Pohl. 12/12/1990. Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, V, Pp. 290. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Volume 1. Monumental Sculpture and Hieroglyphic Inscriptions
Volume 2. Burials
Volume 3. The Ethnozoology of the Maya
Volume 4. General Summary and Conclusions

Seibal is a major ruin of the southern Maya lowlands, its vast ceremonial center covering several high hills on the banks of the Pasion River in the Guatemalan Department of Peten. In five volumes published over a 15-year period, the archaeological team headed by Gordon R. Willey presents a comprehensive review of their fieldwork from 1964 to 1968 and the results of many years of subsequent data analysis. The volumes also report on explorations in the peripheral settlements outside of the Seibal center and provide a regional view of the evolution of lowland Maya culture from the Middle and Late Preclassic through the Late Classic periods.

Skull Shapes and the Map: Craniometric Analyses in the Dispersion of Modern Homo
William White Howells. 3/27/1990. Skull Shapes and the Map: Craniometric Analyses in the Dispersion of Modern Homo, Pp. 200. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

In this sequel to his Cranial Variation in ManWilliam White Howells surveys present-day regional skull shapes by a uniform method, examining the nature and degree of cranial differences discernible between recent Homo sapiens populations around the world.

1989
Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, IV
III Gair Tourtellot. 10/5/1989. Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, IV. Edited by Gordon R. Willey, Pp. 496. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Peripheral Survey and Excavation, Settlement and Community Patterns

Seibal is a major ruin of the southern Maya lowlands, its vast ceremonial center covering several high hills on the banks of the Pasion River in the Guatemalan Department of Peten. In five volumes published over a 15-year period, the archaeological team headed by Gordon R. Willey presents a comprehensive review of their fieldwork from 1964 to 1968 and the results of many years of subsequent data analysis. The volumes also report on explorations in the peripheral settlements outside of the Seibal center and provide a regional view of the evolution of lowland Maya culture from the Middle and Late Preclassic through the Late Classic periods.

1987
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 3: Uaxactun
Ian Graham. 2/9/1987. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 3: Uaxactun, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

1985
Stephen Williams Jeffrey P. and Brain. 7/31/1985. Excavations at the Lake George Site, Yazoo Country, Mississippi, 1958–1960, Pp. 512. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

This milestone volume describes and interprets excavations at one of the greatest late prehistoric sites in the southeastern United States. Lake George reached its zenith between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries A.D., during the florescence of the Mississippian culture. This is a detailed analysis of the site and its relationship to the corpus of Southeastern archaeology.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 1: Introduction
Ian Graham. 6/10/1985. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 1: Introduction, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

Volume 1 includes a Spanish translation of the Introduction text and six appendices: sources of sculpture and their codes; list of abbreviations and symbols used in the Corpus series; table of tun-endings between 8.1.15.0.0 and 10.9.3.0.0; a complete Calendar Round in tabular form, giving the position of tun-endings between 8.1.15.0.0 and 10.9.3.0.0; a method for the quick computation of Calendar Round position, by John S. Justeson; and Moon Age tables, by Lawrence Roys.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 2: Xultun
Eric von Euw and Ian Graham. 6/10/1985. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 2: Xultun, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

1983
Rural Economy in the Early Iron Age
Peter S. Wells. 11/28/1983. Rural Economy in the Early Iron Age, Pp. 192. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

This volume presents data and analysis on settlement structure, subsistence patterns, manufacturing, and trade from the Peabody Museum’s four seasons of excavation at Hascerkeller, Bavaria, a typical Central European agricultural community at the start of the final millennium B.C.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 1: Tonina
Peter Mathews. 8/1/1983. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 6: Part 1: Tonina, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts. 

Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, III
Gordon R. Willey, A. Ledyard Smith, Jeremy A. Sabloff, Ronald L. Bishop, Garman Harbottle, Robert L. Rands, and Edward V. Sayre. 3/1/1983. Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, III, Pp. 260. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

1. Major Architecture and Caches. 2. Analyses of Fine Paste Ceramics

Seibal is a major ruin of the southern Maya lowlands, its vast ceremonial center covering several high hills on the banks of the Pasion River in the Guatemalan Department of Peten. In five volumes published over a 15-year period, the archaeological team headed by Gordon R. Willey presents a comprehensive review of their fieldwork from 1964 to 1968 and the results of many years of subsequent data analysis. The volumes also report on explorations in the peripheral settlements outside of the Seibal center and provide a regional view of the evolution of lowland Maya culture from the Middle and Late Preclassic through the Late Classic periods.

1982
An Osteology of Some Maya Mammals
Stanley J. Olsen. 2/4/1982. An Osteology of Some Maya Mammals, Pp. 104. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

The bone remains of a considerable range of vertebrate mammals have been recovered in the course of excavations at Maya archaeological sites. Many of the mammals represented in those collections are peculiar to Central America and have not been treated in osteological studies. This volume has been designed to aid in the identification of faunal remains recovered in the Maya area and is intended particularly for those archaeologists not having the large comparative mammal collections in their institutions. A number of the skeletons are figured for the first time.

1980
Mariana Mesa: Seven Prehistoric Settlements in West-Central New Mexico
Charles R. McGimsey III. 6/13/1980. Mariana Mesa: Seven Prehistoric Settlements in West-Central New Mexico, Pp. 320. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

A detailed report on the excavations of, and a comprehensive account and analysis of artifacts and materials from, seven settlements that varied in size from units of one or two families to small communities of several dozen individual houses.

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 2: Part 3: Ixkun, Ucanal, Ixtutz, Naranjo
Ian Graham. 3/12/1980. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 2: Part 3: Ixkun, Ucanal, Ixtutz, Naranjo, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 1: Yaxchilan
Ian Graham and Eric von Euw. 3/12/1980. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 1: Yaxchilan, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts. 

Volume 3 documents the lintels and hieroglyphic stairways  of Yaxchilan, Chiapas, Mexico.

1979
Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 2: Yaxchilan
Ian Graham. 5/25/1979. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 3: Part 2: Yaxchilan, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

Volume 3 documents the lintels and hieroglyphic stairways  of Yaxchilan, Chiapas, Mexico.

 

Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 1: Xultun
Eric von Euw. 1/1/1979. Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 5: Part 1: Xultun, Pp. 64. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

For more than 45 years, the Peabody Museum has been publishing The Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions. The goal of this unique series of folio volumes is to document in photographs and detailed line drawings all known Maya inscriptions and their associated figurative art to advance the study of the ancient Maya. When complete, the Corpus will have published the inscriptions from over 200 sites and 2,000 monuments. The series has been instrumental in the remarkable success of the ongoing process of deciphering Maya writing, making available hundreds of texts to epigraphers working around the world, and to source communities in in Honduras, Guatemala, and Mexico.

Each volume in the series consists of three or more fascicles, which examine an individual site or group of neighboring sites and include maps of site location and plans indicating the placement monuments within each site. Each inscription is reproduced in its entirety in both photographs and line drawings with descriptive texts.

 

1978
Bones from Awatovi
Stanley J. Olsen. 12/1/1978. Bones from Awatovi, Pp. 84. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

Bones from Awatovi contains a detailed analysis of the massive collection of both the faunal remains and the bone/antler artifacts recovered from the site of Awatovi. Unique in its size and degree of preservation, the Awatovi faunal collection provides rich ground for analysis and interpretation. Olsen and Wheeler deliver an in-depth examination which is of interest to archaeologists and faunal analysts alike.

Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, II
Gordon R. Willey, III Gair Tourtellot, Jeremy A. Sabloff, Robert Sharick, Norman Hammond, and Richard M. Rose. 6/1/1978. Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, II, Pp. 262. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

1. Artifacts. 2. A Reconnaissance of Cancun. 3. A Brief Reconnaissance of Itzan

Seibal is a major ruin of the southern Maya lowlands, its vast ceremonial center covering several high hills on the banks of the Pasion River in the Guatemalan Department of Peten. In five volumes published over a 15-year period, the archaeological team headed by Gordon R. Willey presents a comprehensive review of their fieldwork from 1964 to 1968 and the results of many years of subsequent data analysis. The volumes also report on explorations in the peripheral settlements outside of the Seibal center and provide a regional view of the evolution of lowland Maya culture from the Middle and Late Preclassic through the Late Classic periods.

Mecklenburg Collection, Part II: The Iron Age Cemetery of Magdalenska gora in Slovenia
Hugh Hencken. 6/1/1978. Mecklenburg Collection, Part II: The Iron Age Cemetery of Magdalenska gora in Slovenia, Pp. 330. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. BUY THIS BOOKAbstract

These three volumes deal with the Iron Age grave materials from Magdalenska gora, excavated by the Duchess Paul Friedrich von Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The Duchess of Mecklenburg, a member of an Austrian royal family with estates in Slovenia, conducted her excavations in the early years of the twentieth century. The materials from Magdalenska gora were purchased by the Peabody Museum in the 1930s.

1974
Jades from the Cenote of Sacrifice, Chichen Itza, Yucatan
Tatiana Proskouriakoff. 1974. Jades from the Cenote of Sacrifice, Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Pp. 217. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Peabody Museum Press. jades_from_the_cenote_redacted.pdf

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